Film Review: “Don’t Worry Darling” (2022)

We’ve seen this before, Darling.

Chris Salazar

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In 1975, a psychological thriller known as “The Stepford Wives” was released. The film, which is based on the novel written by Ira Levin, was made as a satirical look at the traditional, white picket fence lifestyle. A life that is normally associated with traditional, man-made American suburbia. In 2004, the film would be remade with Yoda himself, Frank Oz, at the helm and a cast that included Nicole Kidman, Glenn Close, Matthew Broderick, & Christopher Walken. While neither film was heralded as a classic by critics nor audiences, many people still resonated with its themes of how things would turn out if the entire world consisted of man-made traditionalism where “women would just remain in the kitchen while the men go to work.” The reason I bring this up is that Olivia Wilde’s latest film, “Don’t Worry Darling”, is (at least in terms of concept) basically a modern update of “The Stepford Wives”.

Usually, when I review movies, I try my best to leave my beliefs at the door. I prioritize fairness over everything. Granted, I, like everyone else, have my biases. An example is that I am not as big on musicals as some of my peers are. Whether the film is made through any particular lens or isn’t does not impact my enjoyment of it. If you look close enough, you’ll find something “Problematic” with just about everything. Either way, it’s just a movie. Superfluous rant aside, let’s talk about Olivia Wilde’s latest “original” film, “Don’t Worry Darling”.

The film stars Florence Pugh as Alice, a housewife living in a 1950s utopia called The Victory Project. Her Husband, Jack (Harry Styles), goes to work every day along with all of the other men in the neighborhood while Alice stays home. Just like the rest of the women in the neighborhood, they cook, clean, and gossip. Everything seems normal until Alice notices her neighbor, Margeret (Kiki Layne) looking and acting very much out of place. Soon, Alice begins to question her “perfect” life and starts investigating everything around her. As things take a turn for the worst, Victory’s charismatic CEO, Frank (Chris Pine), starts to catch on.

If that story sounds familiar, it’s because it is. Aside from it being an unofficial, post-modern “Stepford Wives” reboot, “Don’t Worry Darling” is…

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Chris Salazar

28 | Fiction Writer | usually writes about anything but, mostly about film