Film Review: “Halloween Ends” (2022)

Does evil go out with a bang or a whimper?

Chris Salazar

--

For nearly 45 years, John Carpenter’s classic “Halloween” franchise has taken the world of horror by storm. From the film’s iconic theme song to the infamously terrifying Michael Meyers, to beloved final girl Laurie Strode played by the legendary Jamie Lee Curtis, A lot of the slasher genre owes a great big debt to the original 1978 film. When “Halloween” was first conceived, it was done so in 17 days on a meager budget of $325,000 ($1.5 million in today’s world) with no expectations of a franchise, let alone multiple timelines. However, once the film made around $50-$60 million at the box office, the possibilities were endless. We were graced with endless sequels, off-shoots (“Season of the Witch”), and even a remake. The story of a masked man haunting the town of Haddonfield still, after 4 decades, remains ripe for commercial opportunity.

As is the case with most horror franchises, I’ve had my ups & downs with the Halloween franchise. While the original from 1978 will no doubt remain a horror classic, I’ve always found 1998’s “Halloween H20: 20 Years Later” to be one of my all-time favorites. To me, it had the best version of Laurie Strode, a solid supporting cast (Josh Hartnett, LL Cool J, & Academy Award Nominee Michelle Williams), and an epic showdown between Laurie and Micheal. I also really enjoyed the 2018 “requel” as well. Just like with H20, “Halloween (2018)” (or as I sometimes call it, “H40”) also shows a more bad-ass Laurie Strode getting ready to take on the shape once and for all and even had one hell of a third act. Sure, it’s not without its issues: dumb podcasters, The evil doctor twist, and some out-of-place humor, but It still remained a true return to form for the franchise after the gratuitous Rob Zombie remake from 2007 and its bizarre and pretentious 2009 sequel. As for last year’s follow-up, “Halloween Kills”, not so much. While the film is certainly true in its advertising, It was an absolute step down from its predecessor. The film may have featured plenty of carnage and an exploration of mob mentality but, the movie not only sidelined Laurie but, suffered from being the middle chapter of a trilogy. In other words, all blood and no payoff.

--

--

Chris Salazar

28 | Fiction Writer | usually writes about anything but, mostly about film