Film Review: “Infinite” (2021)

A generic, disappointing mess.

Chris Salazar

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Mark Wahlberg in Infinite (2021)

When I initially saw the trailer for “Infinite,” I was pretty enthusiastic about the film. Now, I knew better than to expect Shakespearian high art from a movie such as this, but I hoped “Infinite” would be nothing more than a fun popcorn movie. The film’s trailer gave off a vibe that reminded me of those campy action films that came out before 9/11: fast, loose, & swimming in all sorts of cheese. The films wher the narrative didn’t have to be deep, a timely political message was far from required, & the characters were as simple and likeable as can be. Six-year-old me loved these movies then, and 26 year old me appreciates the hell out of these films today, especially in a landscape dominated by Intellectual Properties such as Marvel, DC, & Star Wars.

While I enjoy many current films, I felt a breath of fresh air back in May when I saw the Angelina Jolie film, “Those Who Wish Me Dead,” due to it standing out among a sea of CGI-slugfests. So where does that leave “Infinite”? Let’s find out.

Antoine Fuqua (Training Day, Southpaw) Directed Infinite stars Mark Wahlberg as a man with schizophrenia named Evan McCauley. Evan’s hallucinations are revealed to be memories from the different lives lived where he has gathered talents that he still holds to this day. With the villainous Bathurst (Chiwetel Ejiofor) threatening to end all life as he knows it, Evan must use his talents to take down Bathurst and save the world.

If you have just read through the previous paragraph and thought to yourself, “wait a minute, I’ve seen this before, “then you are correct. The entire premise of “Infinite” is a revolving door of clichés. The only difference between this movie and several other generic action movies from the 90s and early 2000s is that the protagonist has schizophrenia instead of amnesia. The plot is not only generic but, the screenplay is an absolute dumpster fire. There are plenty of expositional moments that feel bland, dragged on, and ultimately forced. Even Wahlberg’s narration feels lifeless.

Instead of the fun and campy early 2000s film that the trailer promised, I bared witness to a dull and joyless letdown that took it so far too seriously. After the opening scene (which is one of the best scenes in the entire film)…

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Chris Salazar

28 | Fiction Writer | usually writes about anything but, mostly about film