Film Review: “The Matrix Resurrections” (2021)

Party like it’s 2003

Chris Salazar

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Back in 1999, The Wachowskis exploded onto the scene with a classic gothic sci-fi thriller known as “The Matrix”. The film was a rousing success as it combined groundbreaking action with cerebral commentary. “The Matrix” wasn’t just a great film but, a game changer for Hollywood in the late 90s and the early 00s. The Matrix itself became a pop culture phenomenon back then: Anime films (“Animatrix”), video games (“Enter The Matrix”), and an all-around dedicated fan base, “The Matrix”, at one point, became for 90s teens what “Star Trek” was to their parents. Many films would go onto copy (i.e. “Resident Evil: Afterlife”) or parody it (i.e. “Pootie Tang”, “Kung Pow: Enter The Fist”) for many years to come.

In 2003, The Wachowskis released both “The Matrix: Reloaded” and “The Matrix: Revolutions” back to back. Both were quite successful at the box office but, they failed to live up to the classic first film. While I at least found a few things to like about “Reloaded” (mainly the car chase involving the twins), “Revloutions” left a pretentiously sour taste in my mouth. However, after nearly 20 years, Lana Wachowski brings us back to the world of the Matrix with “The Matrix: Ressurections”. Will “Ressurections” be a return to form or will it contribute to the slippery slope that is the decline in the franchise?

Taking place twenty years after “Revolutions”, Neo (Keanu Reeves) is living his normal life under his original identity, Tom Anderson, in present day San Francisco. Neo, who has been having strange dreams and visions lately, is going to a therapist (Neil Patrick Harris) who perscribes him medication to counteract said visions. All of that changes however when he walks into a cafe one day and meets a woman who posses the likeness of Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss). Neo’s memory continues to get jogged as he is greeted by a new version of Morpheus (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) who brings him back into the world of the Matrix in order to fight a new enemy.

When I first saw the trailer for “Resurrections”, I had one major concern: it was going be a retread of the first film with a new cast. Think “The Force Awakens” but, set in the world of The Matrix as opposed to Star Wars. While, that fear became a bit of a reality, It managed to take the “Force…

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Chris Salazar

28 | Fiction Writer | usually writes about anything but, mostly about film